Jacek Kolacz, chief scientist with the IU Kinsey Institute Traumatic Stress Research Consortium.
Jacek Kolacz, chief scientist with the IU Kinsey Institute Traumatic Stress Research Consortium.
Indiana University researchers have found, through surveys and other data sources, a general sense of optimism about 2021.

While developments such as the recent approval of COVID-19 vaccines have certainly provided reasons to be hopeful, hardships stemming from the pandemic are expected to linger through at least the early part of this year. And the residual effects of trauma experienced during the pandemic could persist even longer.

“People need to know the situation is not going to change overnight,” said Jacek Kolacz, chief scientist with the IU Kinsey Institute Traumatic Stress Research Consortium. “We still have a lot challenges related to the pandemic.”

Kolacz and his colleagues have been studying how the pandemic has been affecting people’s lives since March. Their findings are consistent with other researchers who have found rising rates of anxiety, depression and symptoms of PTSD over that time.

Other research has shown that even when the original source of those mental health issues is gone, symptoms can continue. That’s why Kolacz recommended people continue monitoring their own mental health and that of their loved ones in 2021.
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