Thr Centers of Disease Control and Prevention report possible run-off from agricultural fields can soak into the ground, contaminating the ground water in wells. Photo by Erika Malone, Ball State University
Thr Centers of Disease Control and Prevention report possible run-off from agricultural fields can soak into the ground, contaminating the ground water in wells. Photo by Erika Malone, Ball State University
Fields of corn and soybeans stretch across much of the farmland in Indiana, using large amounts of water, pesticides and herbicides each year.

For some rural farmers, not having access to municipal water, their source for water is through a private well. Excess water and chemicals from farming have to flow somewhere. Runoff from the fields can soak in the ground, contaminating the groundwater in that well.

According to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, runoff is not the only possible cause for contamination: Septic tanks and naturally occurring chemicals like arsenic and nitrate can cause contamination to groundwater if not treated or tested properly.

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Due to runoff and other natural complications, it’s not uncommon for private wells to become contaminated, and if they go unchecked, a contaminated well could cause serious health issues.

According to the Environmental Protection Agency’s website, consuming high levels of heavy metals that can be found in groundwater movement and runoff in many private wells risk chronic toxicity, kidney damage and cancer.

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