GREENFIELD — A developer intends to build 152 houses on the city’s west side.

Indianapolis-based Arbor Homes is planning the neighborhood, to be called Woodfield Pointe, on about 65 acres off the west side of North Windswept Road between U.S. 40 and County Road 100N. The subdivision of single-family homes will border Prairie Meadows Apartments’ north and northeast sides.

The land for the neighborhood is part of the Sawmill planned unit development, which has had multiple phases of development dating to 2002. That includes more than 350 lots platted on more than 100 acres to the east of the area slated for Woodfield Pointe.

“This is filling in some of those spaces of the PUD (planned unit development) that are not built out yet,” said Jenna Wertman, Greenfield senior planner, at a city plan commission meeting this week.

As a part of the Sawmill planned unit development, the new neighborhood will follow the development patterns and aesthetics outlined in its standards.

The eastern boundary of the subdivision will have larger parcels, about a half-acre, facing Windswept Road. West of that, lots will be just under a fifth of an acre, with some larger on corners and in cul-de-sacs.

Woodfield Pointe will also have sidewalks, walking trails, an 8-foot multi-use path along Windswept Road and a playground. Most of the wooded area on the site will be preserved and will have natural unpaved walking trails around it.

Sean Downey, project engineer for Arbor Homes, said the neighborhood will likely be done in two sections.

“You’re looking maybe at a two-year period of construction and then, God willing, the lots go quickly, because that’s what we’re excited to do, is get some more lots there on the ground in Greenfield,” Downey said.

Caitlin Dopher, entitlement manager for Arbor Homes, said the company expects an average sales price of $235,000 in Woodfield Pointe.

Several Greenfield residents spoke at the plan commission meeting. While none said they oppose the subdivision, they shared concerns over how it could impact drainage and property values along with traffic and speeding on Windswept Road.

Officials said the neighborhood’s drainage will flow west to two ponds planned for the west side of the site and that the subdivision likely wouldn’t negatively impact property values.

Jason Koch, Greenfield city engineer and a member of the plan commission, said he thinks more houses along Windswept Road will discourage motorists from driving too fast.

“When there’s open cornfields and open space, people feel safer to drive that fast,” he said.

The plan commission unanimously approved a primary plat for the subdivision, part of a multi-step process for overseeing plans before development begins.
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