Julie Campbell-Miller, Pride Center of Terre Haute secretary, talks about providing a safe space for the LGBTQIAP+ community to gather. The new center, at 630 Wabash Ave., has its ribbon cutting today and its grand opening on Saturday. Staff photo by Michele Lawson
Julie Campbell-Miller, Pride Center of Terre Haute secretary, talks about providing a safe space for the LGBTQIAP+ community to gather. The new center, at 630 Wabash Ave., has its ribbon cutting today and its grand opening on Saturday. Staff photo by Michele Lawson
Strategically aligned with Pride Month, the Pride Center of Terre Haute will host a celebration of visibility, self-worth and dignity for members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, asexual, pansexual LGBTQIAP+ community.

Located in downtown Terre Haute office at Center City, 630 Wabash Ave., the Pride Center of Terre Haute will have a ribbon cutting today at 4 pm and a grand opening Saturday at 3 pm.

The idea for the center started last summer when a group of Indiana State University social work students discovered that there was a great need for a safe space for the LGBTQIAP+ community to gather and to educate the general public about the contributions and inherent worth of the community.

“It’s scary when you feel like you don’t have a place to go that is safe and accommodating,” said President Nichelle Campbell-Miller, who will work with the Center’s Youth Advisory Board.

“I take the responsibility very seriously to make a safe place where people can feel open and proud to be themselves without being judged about their sexual orientation.”

She said a lot of collaboration with various local groups have expanded the number of volunteers, about 60, who are engaged with fostering a sense of community.

Modeled on Pride Centers in other Indiana cities such as Bloomington, Indianapolis and Spencer, the Pride Center of Terre Haute will serve the Wabash Valley as a resource hub for education, social support, health information, arts, culture and other programming for LGBTQIAP+ people, questioning individuals and their families and allies.

Teens and adults can get help with a needs assessment and legal gender name changes. Support and book groups are available and the center is open for all people who want to play board games or need a safe place to relax. The center is open to all on Saturdays and Sundays from 12 to 8 pm.

“We will provide affirming and life-saving care, and as we grow, we’ll build upon our services,” said Secretary Julie Campbell-Miller, who focuses on programming for mental health and wellness.
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