The tremors from Thursday's earthquake was felt across the state as shown in this  map provided by the U.S. Geological Society.
The tremors from Thursday's earthquake was felt across the state as shown in this map provided by the U.S. Geological Society.
If you felt the walls around you and the earth below you shake a little after 3 p.m. Thursday, you were not alone.

A 3.8 magnitude earthquake with an epicenter near the Montezuma and Bloomingdale area sent tremors across much of Indiana that were felt in parts of Howard County and Kokomo, according to the United States Geological Survey. The Bloomingdale and Montezuma area is roughly 90 miles east from Kokomo, near the Indiana-Illinois border.

According to the USGS, the depth of the tremors were felt as far east as Muncie, as far south as Bloomington, as far west as Decatur, Illinois, and as far north as Lake County. The USGS says earthquakes with the magnitude of 3.5 or less on the Richter scale are often not felt.

A 3.8 on the Richter scale is categorized as “minor” and described as “often felt by people, but rarely causes damage. Shaking of indoor objects can be noticeable.”

Many county residents took to social media to report that their home walls shook during the earthquake. No major damage or injuries due to the earthquake were reported as of Thursday evening.

While Indiana may not be the first state that comes to mind when one thinks of earthquakes, they do occasionally happen. That’s because the state sits near two fault lines and seismic zones — the Wabash Valley seismic zone and the New Madrid seismic zone.

The two zones have been responsible for some major earthquakes in the past — the most recent being a 5.2 magnitude earthquake in 2008 that originated near Mount Carmel, Illinois. The earthquake was felt several states over and caused damage to various buildings and bridges across the Midwest.
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