Kate Luczkowski and Kelsie Noble check out customers Friday at the Pink Pineapple Boutique in Granger. MICHAEL CATERINA/SOUTH BEND TRIBUNE
Kate Luczkowski and Kelsie Noble check out customers Friday at the Pink Pineapple Boutique in Granger. MICHAEL CATERINA/SOUTH BEND TRIBUNE
Kelsie Noble isn’t opening her local boutique on Black Friday because, for her, it’s simply not worth it.

“Last year, I went all out — I had extended hours, sales, the whole bit,” the owner of Pink Pineapple Boutique in Granger said. “I understand the pandemic (effects), however people were still out. … Big box retailers were full, so I don't think people were scared. I just don't know if they shop small on Black Friday.”

Traditionally, Black Friday kicks off the holiday shopping season and is geared toward big box retailers, who entice customers to stand in line in the early mornings for "door-buster" deals. The retail holiday has become a custom for many families and, previously, some retailers opted to open on Thanksgiving day to stretch the in-store shopping out even more.

But for shopping friends Retta Vandriessche and Wanda Richie, shopping on Black Friday has never been their cup of tea. 

“(There’s) too many people, and the lines are too long,” Vandriessche said. “I like the little local boutiques because … I’m not going to walk out and have the same outfits as 10 other people.”

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